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Brain and Language
Volume 4, Issue 3 , July 1977, Pages 403-431

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doi:10.1016/0093-934X(77)90035-9    How to Cite or Link Using DOI (Opens New Window)  
Copyright © 1977 Published by Elsevier Inc.

The role of the cerebral hemispheres in music*1

Anne GatesCorresponding Author Contact Information and John L. Bradshaw

Monash University, Australia


Available online 30 August 2004.


Abstract

This review examines the cerebral control of musical behaviors. In clinical populations, impairment of related musical and linguistic functions, such as reading, writing, articulation, time sense, and prosody, implies the likely role of the language hemisphere in music. Similarly, for both clinical and normal populations, an investigation of mental abilities common to music and language points to left hemisphere control for certain aspects of temporal order, duration, simultaneity, rhythm, effector motor control, and categorical perception. While clinical studies have revealed deficits in various kinds of music capabilities with both left and right cerebral lesions, normal subjects similarly demonstrate varying degrees of asymmetry for components of music emphasizing pitch, harmony, timbre, intensity, and rhythm. Since differential laterality effects are apparent as a function of subjects' training or adopted strategies, the way musical information is processed may be an important determinant of hemispheric mediation. One hemisphere should not be regarded as “dominant” for music, but rather each interacts with the other, operating according to its own specialization.


Corresponding Author Contact InformationCorresponding author. Requests for reprints should be sent to Anne Gates, Department of Psychology, Monash University, , Clayton, Victoria 3168, , Australia.

*1 This research was supported by the Music and Psychology Departments of Monash University and by an award from the Australian Research Grants Committee to the second author.



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Brain and Language
Volume 4, Issue 3 , July 1977, Pages 403-431


 
 
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